Router Bits, Saw Blades, CNC Router Bits and Shaper Cutters

 
Homepage > Faqs
 
 


Please select a question to reveal the answer.

When I am purchasing a router bit, how can I be sure that I am buying a quality tool?

What size shank should I use with my router?

What is a proper way to install a router bit into a collet?

What is the maximum RPM you can run a router bit?

What is the most important part of the router bit?

I have been told that 'C-4' grade carbide is the best carbide for all applications. Is this information accurate?


What is the leading cause of dulling cutting tools?


When should I use a single flute, two-flute and three-flute bit?

Why would I use a compression bit over a straight bit when cutting double sided melamine?

What are the benefits of using 'insert' tooling?

I have been looking for both stile & rail cutters and raised panel cutters for my router. Your catalog shows these items with a 1/2" shank. Are they available with 1/4" shank?

How do I know when it's time to re-sharpen my router bits and saw blades?

I'm getting a vibration when I'm routing. What could be causing it?

While ripping, I experience burning of the material. What could be causing it?

I'm getting blade vibration when my saw reaches maximum RPM. What could be the cause?

I noticed that my cut is wider than the blade kerf. What could be the cause?

I am getting blow out on the bottom of the cut. What could be the reason?

What is the maximum R.P.M for horizontal raised panel and other large diameter router bits?


I recently purchased the Amana Tool® 'Bullseye' Rosette Cutter System and am very pleased with the design and performance. I would like to know if I can use this cutter in my router?

I own a 10" table saw and I can not seem to find the right saw blade for cutting 'melamine'. Any Suggestions?

Can you re-bore your saw blade to different sizes?

I have a 10" table saw, what size dado set up should I use?

My shop does a lot of dado cutting with a router. Being that plywood and other sheets goods are either metric or undersized by 1/32", do you have straight bits with exact dimensions?

Do you manufacture a router bit for cutting plastics, especially acrylic?

I was told that you have a router bit for fabricating Wilsonart SSV. Could you provide more information?


We are trying to match an existing molding in a circa 1930's home. After looking through your catalog, we could not find an exact match. Can you make a custom router bit or shaper cutter?







When I am purchasing a router bit, how can I be sure that I am buying a quality tool?
A quality router bit should have a solid tool-steel body that is well machined (not cast) and is substantial in thickness and weight. The carbide should also be substantial and have a very fine grind, practically like a mirror finish. In the case of 'form' type router bits (corner round, cove, ogee, etc.), the carbide should have a shear angle. The shear angle can be viewed from the side and the carbide will appear 'tilted' or leaning. For comparison, view a straight bit and you will see that the carbide is parallel to the shank. The carbide and the body should also have the same relative shape, except the body will, of course, be smaller than the carbide. There should be adequate and consistent clearance between the shape of the body and the carbide. The brazing should appear even and consistent, and without any voids or gaps. If the tool has a ball bearing guide, there should be no 'wobble', as this would indicate an imbalanced tool. Finally, the overall appearance should be clean and show good attention to detail.


What size shank should I use with my router?

Always use the largest shank possible that your router will accommodate. Also, it is best to use the shortest possible cutting edge available that will meet the requirements of the application. Excessive cutting edge length and/or overall length compounds vibration and deflection - a leading cause of tool breakage.


What is the proper way to install a router bit into the collet?
Insert the router bit in all the way until it bottoms out then backing off 1/16". This will allow enough room for shank expansion and keep the router bit from freezing in the collet.



What is the maximum RPM you can run a router bit?
Most router bits can run at router manufactures maximum RPM's, but there are a few exceptions due to size and application. Always check either the RPM guide supplied with the router bit, the Amana Tool® catalog or call the Amana Tool® HOT LINE at 1.800.445.0077.


What is the most important part of the router bit?
Believe it or not, the shank (shaft) of the router bit is the most important part. If the shank is not perfectly concentric, there will be excessive vibration, run-out and imbalance, and can cause poor quality cutting. This is particularly important for large diameter router bits which can be extremely dangerous if they are not properly manufactured. Equally important is the accuracy and condition of the router collet.


I have been told that 'C-4' grade carbide is the best carbide for all applications. Is this information accurate?
No. Contrary to popular belief, there is no single grade of carbide that is suitable for every situation. For example, saw blades for ripping wood and for cutting non-ferrous metals (aluminum, etc.) use softer grades such as C-1 or C-2. If C-4 grade were used, it would be too brittle for these materials. Amana Tool® uses the most appropriate grade of carbide that gives the best durability, performance, finish, and tool-life. Carbide grain size, binder, and ultimate surface quality (grinding) must also be taken into consideration when manufacturing high-quality cutting tools.


What is the leading cause of dulling cutting tools?
Excessive heat is the leading cause of cutting edge deterioration. This can occur from cutting very abrasive materials such as MDF, melamine, plywood, etc. In addition, cutting tools become overheated and dull from improper and infrequent sharpenings, incorrect feed-rates and RPM, excessive removal of material, inappropriate cutting tool selection for the type of material and machine, and inadequate horsepower.


When should I use a single flute, two-flute and three-flute bit?
Single flute bits are primarily used for cutting to size when speed is more important than finish. Two and three flute bits are used when finish is more important then speed. The more flutes you use the slower the feed rate.


Why would I use a compression bit over a straight bit when cutting double sided melamine?
Compression bits are designed to compress the material to avoid chipping and tearing the material. The result is a much cleaner cut without chipping or tearing the melamine.


What are the benefits of using 'insert' tooling?
Although the initial cost is higher, there are several real advantages to insert tooling, or tooling that uses replaceable knives. The primary benefit is that no re-sharpening is necessary. Most insert tools have at least two cutting edges per knife, while some have four. When the knife becomes dull, you simply loosen the knife (or knives), rotate them and re-tighten. This can often be done without removing the cutter from the machine or router, which saves valuable set-up time. Of course, it is important to unplug the machine before changing knives. Another key feature of insert tools is there is no diameter loss as with re-sharpened tools. This is particularly beneficial if tight tolerances must be adhered to, or if the piece being cut must exactly match the previous piece.


I have been looking for both stile & rail cutters and raised panel cutters for my router. Your catalog shows these items with a 1/2" shank. Are they available with 1/4" shank?
The regular cabinet door stile and rail sets include the tongue and groove portion of this type of joinery, thereby exceeding the safe capacity of 1/4" shanks. In addition, the raised panel type router bits have a profile that is also too large for 1/4" shanks. However, pages 40 and 41of our 2003 catalog shows a series of 1/4" shank stile and rail cutters.


How do I know when it's time to re-sharpen my router bits and saw blades?
When cutting tools become dull, there is a noticeable difference in: 1.) the finish quality of the cut (burning may also occur); 2.) the amount of necessary horsepower or the amount of feed-rate required to maintain the cut; 3.) the sound from the machine motor and the sound from the cutting action (usually a higher pitch and decibel); 4.) the size of the chips from the cut (will become smaller or turn to dust) because the cutting tool is grinding or abrading the material rather than cutting it; 5.) the color of the cutting tool will change. It will become blue or black from overheating and 'work-hardening'. The router collet or other tool holding device may also become overheated; 6.) the surface quality of the cutting edge - will eventually chip or break. 'Soft' carbide has often been blamed for this phenomenon when, in actuality, the cutter has been run beyond its capacity and useful tool-life. Always have your cutting tools re-sharpened by a reputable grinding service.


I'm getting a vibration when I'm routing. What could be causing it?
There are a few reasons that will cause a vibration. Check to make sure the router shaft and collet are clean, and in good condition. Also check the RPM's. You may be running it faster than the maximum.


While ripping, I experience burning of the material. What could be causing it?
The most common reasons are, that you are either ripping with too many teeth, you are not feeding your material fast enough or your fence is not aligned with the blade properly.


I'm getting blade vibration when my saw reaches maximum RPM. What could be the cause?
First check to see if the blade is mounted properly and the arbor and collars are clean. Second, check the arbor to make sure it is running true and not bent. Also check your drive belt for slippage.


I noticed that my cut is wider than the blade kerf. What could be the cause?
Check the alignment of the blade to the fence. This is the number one reason why the cut is wider then the kerf.



I am getting blow out on the bottom of the cut. What could be the reason?
First make sure you're using the proper blade for the application with the right amount of teeth per inch and tooth configuration for the material you are
cutting. If you are still having a problem, adjust your cutting height by either raising or lowering your blade.


What is the maximum R.P.M for horizontal raised panel and other large diameter router bits?
Generally, all large diameter router bits (approx. 2" and larger) should be run at a reduced R.P.M., usually about 14,000 max and 12,000 ideal. This gives you more control over the cut and the feed-rate. Also, bits of this type are normally used in a table-mounted router with a minimum of 2-1/2 horsepower. Adjustments to the R.P.M., feed-rate, and amount of material being removed must be made based upon the type of material, the horsepower, moisture content and the like. With large diameter cutters, it is best to first remove as much material as possible (by means of chamfering or using a smaller radius, etc). Save the large cutter for the final few light passes only. This method is not only safer but will give a better quality finish and longer tool-life. For more information, check with your router owner's manual and specific instructions for the particular tools that you intend to use.



I recently purchased the Amana Tool® 'Bullseye' Rosette Cutter System and am very pleased with the design and performance. I would like to know if I can use this cutter in my router?
The Rosette Cutter is not recommended for use with a router for several reasons: 1.) the maximum rated R.P.M. for the Rosette Cutter is too slow for a router; 2.) a router is not stable enough; and 3.) the Rosette Cutter does not have a center point (as with a standard drill bit). For these reasons, this type of tool is recommended only for use in a heavy-duty drill press, milling machine or lathe. Furthermore, the workpiece must be securely clamped and a relatively slow feed rate should be used.



I own a 10" table saw and I can not seem to find the right saw blade for cutting 'melamine'. Any Suggestions?
Yes. For regular use try the Amana Tool® #MB10800, which is a 10" diameter, 80 tooth blade with negative hook angle and 'high-ATB' grind. For moderate to heavy production, try the new Ditec 2000(tm) Series, #DT10720. Both of these blades will cut melamine chip-free on both sides of the material provided that the fence is square and the arbor is running true. Also, it is helpful to have a close fitting throat plate so the material is supported on the bottom as close to the cut as possible.



Can you re-bore your saw blade to different sizes?
Yes, we can re-bore most saw blades and dado sets to fit almost any size machine on the market. Please see page 188 in our 2006 Catalog for further information.



I have a 10" table saw, what size dado set up should I use?
As a rule of thumb, when working with a 10" table saw, you would use an 8" dado set. If working on a 8" saw, you would use a 6" dado set.



My shop does a lot of dado cutting with a router. Being that plywood and other sheets goods are either metric or undersized by 1/32", do you have straight bits with exact dimensions?
Yes, we have a special series of plunge/straight bits that are specifically designed for this purpose. Among others, they include sizes such as 23/32" (3/4"), 19/32" (5/8"), 16mm, 18mm, etc. Please see our 2003 Catalog page #5 for more information.


Do you manufacture a router bit for cutting plastics, especially acrylic?
Yes, we basically have two types: One for abrasive or hard plastics such as acrylic of phenolic resin and another for softer materials such as PVC, styrene, etc. Please see our 2003 Catalog page #6 for more information.


I was told that you have a router bit for fabricating Wilsonart SSV. Could you provide more information?
The product you are referring to is the Amana Too® 'Superabbet™', which is used for cutting the countertop rabbet, allowing the proper edge recess for the SSV™. Please see our 2003 Catalog page #47 for more information.


We are trying to match an existing molding in a circa 1930's home. After looking through your catalog, we could not find an exact match. Can you make a custom router bit or shaper cutter?
We welcome any new design, but we cannot always accommodate requests for custom tools. Just send in your request, preferably by fax, and we will repond as quickly as possible. Often times a combination of two or more bits will accomplish the intended profile.


 
 
Footer
PRODUCTS WHERE TO BUY LITERATURE & MEDIA CORPORATE INFO
Router Bits Online Dealers Online Catalog About Us
CNC Router Bits Locate a Dealer Woodworking Articles Press Releases
Router Bit Sets Links Woodworking Tips Contact Us
Saw Blades   Safety Guidelines Site Map
Shaper Cutters OUR BRANDS Case Studies  
Boring Bits A.G.E.™ Series FAQs FOLLOW US
Planer Knives Timberline® Videos TwitterFacebookYouTube
Custom Tooling Mamba®  
Hand Tools      
       
Copyright