Cabinet Doors & Drawers

Raised Panel Doors?

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Although this isn't my first time making raised panel doors with cope & stick joinery, I am still learning it. I recently purchased the Amana 54116 panel cutter for its small profile. I am struggling to figure out how the small tongue it creates is supposed to fit into the 3/8" deep groove in the rails & stiles. If I use that bit deep enough to create the 1/4" tongue, then it fits in very shallow, This also makes the panel face stand proud of the R & S face. I prefer that the panel face is flush with the R & S. however it does not have too. That is just my personal preference. I thought about back cutting the panel with a straight bit, but this still seems to not get me anywhere besides flushing the panel face to the R & S. What part of this am I just not understanding? 


Preston, MD

-John

Our Expert


Amana Tool raised panel bit no. 54116 features a small profile which is ideal for scaled-down doors. It works best on 9/16" thick stock which will provide a 1/4" thick edge and a 1/16" fillet, or step around the perimeter of the field. This panel profile works well when used with no.55421 2-piece stile-and-rail set and 3/4" thick frame material. This will place the panel flush with the face of the door frame.

Kitchen Cabinet Doors

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I HAVE THE AMANA RAISED PANEL SET, BOTH Timberline® TRS-260 & Amana Tool® AMS-201 I HAD NO PROBLEM CUTTING THE STILES & RAILS. I WOULD LIKE TO NOW CUT THE TRADITIONAL RAISED PANEL INSERTS. I HAVE A SHOPSMITH WITH ALL THE ATTACHMENTS. THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP YOU MY GIVE ME!

Valley Stream , NY

Our Expert


Whenever you shape raised panels with a router table there are some things to consider: 


-Don't exceed the recommended RPM of the bit.

-Use only flat stock that is free of warp or twist
-Always feed the stock against the bit's rotation. Don't climb cut.
-Take several passes rather than one heavy pass
-Always use panel-raising bits in a table-mounted router. Never use in a hand-held router
-For the best results always shape the end-grain first followed by the long-grain
-Use a guard

Kitchen Cab Doors?

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On cope and stick doors, if you want to add a chamfer or door pull lip all the way around the door, do you recommend this be done before the door is assembled or after? Also, I know you favor a lipped style door. What profile did you use in your kitchen?


Antioch, CA

-Ron

Our Expert


 

Amana offers several door edge profiles such as no.49534.When using a profile around the perimeter of a door it's best to wait until after the door is assmebled. If necessary, you can trim the edges where stile and rail meet before shaping the profile.

I like inset doors and lipped doors because they look more like a furniture door. To creat a lipped door I rout a shallow rabbet around the door perimeter with Amana no.49360. Afterwards, I shape a 3/16" radius "thumbnail" profile with Amana no.49502 corner rounding bit. When the door is closed all but 1/4" of the door thickness will be inside of the cabinet.



Entertainment Center

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I want to make raised panel doors using the trs-250 router bits.  Never done this before.  Any tips on making doors correct size?  They will vary in overall sizes.  Do I run stock through face down?  Should this be done in multiple passes or is it ok to do in single pass?


-Don C.

North Liberty, IA 

Our Expert


For an entertainment center I recommend that you use an overlay type door with a European hinge. Before starting the door construction process purchase the hinges. This way you can size the door to fit the requirements for the hinge. 


When constructing the door the stile-and-rail framework is milled first then the panel is sized to fit within the framework. To determine the overall size of the door measure the opening and add for the door overlap. Next, cut the stock for the frame to size. Stiles and rails for cabinet doors are typically 7/8" thick by two inches wide. It's best to cut the stiles an inch longer than the final size. This way you can trim them to final length after the door is assembled.


The length of the rails is most important; it determines the overall width of the door. To determine the rail length subtract the width of the stiles from the overall width of the door then add back the depth of the cope/panel groove. For example, if the door is 14" wide subtract 4" for the stiles then add 3/4" for the cope at the ends for a total length of 10-3/4". 


With the stock milled to size you're ready to cut the joints. Remember, the bits are for use in a table-mounted router only. Start by shaping the cope at the end of the rails. Use a miter gauge to safely support the stock as you feed it past the bit. Next, shape the sticking/groove along the inside edges of both the stiles and rails. Remember to use a push stick to distance your hands from the bit.


After shaping, dry assemble the door and measure for the panel. To determine the panel size measure the opening in the frame and add 1/2" to both the length and width. This measurement allows the edges of the door to extend 1/4' into the frame groove. Remember, the groove is 3/8" deep. The extra space inside of the groove will allow the panel to expand during the humid summer months.


The panel is shaped face down. To shield your hands from the spinning bit I recommend the Panel-Loc barrier guard. Besides providing protection for yourhands it also works as a hold-down to keep the stock firmly against the table while routing. To avoid splintering the end grain of the panel shapethe ends first, then shape the edges. Depending on the hardness of the wood and the size of your router it will take three to five passes to reach the full profile depth. The panel edge should fit snug within the groove in the frame; this will prevent the panel from rattling when the door is opened. 

Drawers

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I just bought an Amana drawer lock router bit. I've never used one before. Do you have any set up instructions or helpful techniques?


-Craig G.

Our Expert


Raised panel router bits are available with or without a back cutter. The back cutter ensures that the edge of the panel will precisely fit the groove in the frame, even if the panel is thicker than the standard panel thickness of 5/8". Panel cutters without a back cutter work well, too. But the setup is somewhat fussy; you must precisely adjust the height of the bit for a good fit in the frame groove.


Cope-and-stick bits allow you to quickly and easily make stile-and-rail doors for furniture and cabinets. There are two basic types, reversible and two-piece.


Reversible bits
 are an economical choice because you only need one bit to cut both the "cope" and the matching "stick". However, reversible bits require that you disassemble the bit and re-arrange the parts on the shank for the second cut. Also, the decorative "sticking" profiles on reversible bits are limited to symmetrical shapes that can be inverted to create both series of cuts. Reversible bits are not less precise than other types, they just require time to rearrange the parts.


As the name implies, two piece cope-and-stick sets come with two bits; one bit cuts the cope on the ends of the rails, the matching bit cuts the decorative "sticking" profile while simultaneously cutting a groove for the panel. Two-piece bits cost more but they're more convenient because you don't have to stop and rearrange the bit. They're also available in a wider choice of profiles.


Amana has developed a unique style of cope-and-stick set which works with the undersized plywood that is so common today. The new Instile & Rail System™cope and stick bits use shims which allow you to adjust the groove width to the thickness of the plywood. Instile and Rail bits solve the annoying problem of panel rattle when using plywood door panels. 

Dresser Doors

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#1 - I was told by an Amana expert that when I buy a raised panel cutter I should buy one with a back-cutter.  Exactly why is this best for this application?  Also, I will be buying the large type for flat routing on a table.

#2 - Is a Reversible stile & rail assembly less precise a bit than, say, an instile type bit?


-Darrell M. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA

Our Expert


Raised panel router bits are available with or without a back cutter. The back cutter ensures that the edge of the panel will precisely fit the groove in the frame, even if the panel is thicker than the standard panel thickness of 5/8". Panel cutters without a back cutter work well, too. But the setup is somewhat fussy; you must precisely adjust the height of the bit for a good fit in the frame groove.


Cope-and-stick bits allow you to quickly and easily make stile-and-rail doors for furniture and cabinets. There are two basic types, reversible and two-piece.


Reversible bits
 are an economical choice because you only need one bit to cut both the "cope" and the matching "stick". However, reversible bits require that you disassemble the bit and re-arrange the parts on the shank for the second cut. Also, the decorative "sticking" profiles on reversible bits are limited to symmetrical shapes that can be inverted to create both series of cuts. Reversible bits are not less precise than other types, they just require time to rearrange the parts.


As the name implies, two piece cope-and-stick sets come with two bits; one bit cuts the cope on the ends of the rails, the matching bit cuts the decorative "sticking" profile while simultaneously cutting a groove for the panel. Two-piece bits cost more but they're more convenient because you don't have to stop and rearrange the bit. They're also available in a wider choice of profiles.


Amana has developed a unique style of cope-and-stick set which works with the undersized plywood that is so common today. The new Instile & Rail System™cope and stick bits use shims which allow you to adjust the groove width to the thickness of the plywood. Instile and Rail bits solve the annoying problem of panel rattle when using plywood door panels. 


Mission Style Cabinets

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Could you tell me what would be the best way to make mission style cabinet doors. I need router bits too cut rails & stiles and also the door panels. 

-David M. 

Merrill, WI 

Our Expert


Mission style furniture features plain lines, sturdy construction, and rich, figured quarter sawn oak. Doors stiles and rails are wide and surround a flat panel. 
I suggest that you use Amana's new Instile and Rail Mission Style Router Bit set No. 55438

Cope and stick cabinet doors?

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I need a door edge detail that will shape a shallow concave chamfer about 5/8" long on the face and leave a finger pull bead on the very edge. I would like that bead to be about 1/4" . But it seems the 53820 bit allows only a 1/8" bead. Are there any other bits available? Even if it had to be a two step process?



Antioch, CA
-Ron

Our Expert


I've provided a drawing which I believe illustrates what you have described. You can make the profile with two bits, Amana Tool Elongated Core Box no. 45938 and Bullnose no. 51568.

Our Expert


Yes, the Amana Tool no. 54118 has a 1-1/16" reveal and the reveal on the Amana no.54116 is even smaller at 9/16". Both profiles are smaller than a typical full-scale panel. Both of these bits are equipped with a guide bearing for shaping arched panels.

Kitchen Cabinets (doors)?

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I have a question about the Amana Tool Shaker rail-and-stile bit set and the corresponding raised panel bit:


Can the bit set be used to create a long tenon?


Also, on what piece or Shaker region did you model these bits after? I always thought Shaker would be flat panel.


Great Barrington, MA
-Ben

Our Expert


One of the pleasures of reproducing furniture of a specific style is researching the historic pieces to gather design ideas. When featured in woodworking magazines, Shaker furniture is very plain to the point of being bleak. Hwever, although surviving Shaker furniture is somewhat simple, Shaker craftsmen did use attractive lines and sound proportion to add visual appeal to their furniture. One good example is doors on furniture and built-in cabinets. While the Shakers often used flat panels in doors, they also constructed a surprising number of raised panel doors with a simple "thumbnail" sticking. In fact, furniture examples from Enfield, Canterbury, Mt. Lebanon, Sabbathday Lake and Union village all feature raised panel doors.


The short, steep bevel on the Amana Tool no. 54133 is a good example of the typical panel edge on Shaker doors. The Amana Tool no. 55426 Stile-and-Rail bit set creates a simple 3/8" radius "thumbnail" sticking profile.


If you prefer a longer tenon and a true mortise I recommend using the Amana no.49514 3/8" radius corner rounding bit to shape the sticking and cutting a miter in the corners where the sticking intersects. Here is the link to the mitered sticking article on the Amana website:



Divided Light Corner Cabinet?

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Will the Amana #55360 cut arched windows? Do you need to use 7/8" wood to leave room for the glass and attacment? Love your work Fantastic.Thanks John 


Canajoharie, NY

-John

Our Expert


Yes, the Amana Tool no. 55360 Divided Light Door bit set will enable you to make arched doors. The 7/8" thick stock allows room for single strength glass and glazing points and putty.

Cabinet doors?

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I would like to make my own cabinet doors now-raised panel/cope and stick. Could you suggest some classic profiles and also the dimensions of the components to mill? That is, the typical thickness and width of the stile/rail and panel to begin milling with. And how do you size these elements for a given opening in a face frame type cab? 


Thanks.

Antioch, CA
-Ron 

Our Expert


Cabinet doors are typically constructed with a stile-and-rail framework surrounding a "raised panel" (the edges of the panel have a decorative bevel which fit within the groove in the frame). This is a centuries-old construction method that allows the panel to expand and contract seasonally while the outer dimensions of the door remain unchanged.


The stiles run in a vertical direction and the horizontal rails fit between the stiles.


The stock for the stile-and-rail framework is typically 3/4" to 7/8" thick; panels are typically 5/8" thick. These standards have actually been used for centuries and today's router bits and shaper cutters are designed to use these same dimensions.


The width of the stiles and rails on kitchen cabinet doors vary based upon the design and are typically sized from 2" to 3" in width.

Cabinet doors can be designed to fit the cabinet in one of three ways:

1. Flush or Inset--Flush fitting doors must be carefully sized to fit within the cabinet opening. The is a traditional cabinet and door that has made a comeback in recent years and is my personal favorite. To join the stiles and rails I use traditional deep mortise-and-tenon joints. As you can see in the drawing, I add a decorative corner bead to the inside edges with Amana corner bead bit no. 54170 (see the article on the Amana website for techniques for mitered sticking). The no. 54117 traditional raised panel bit completes the look. Although it is labor intensive to fit and hinge inset doors, this style of door is beautiful and worth the extra effort.


2. Lipped--Lipped doors have a rabbet around the door perimeter and when closed, most of the door thickness is inside of the cabinet. This is also a

traditional door and it less work to fit than inset doors. To cut the joints on this door I recommend Amanano. 55439 Mission Style stile-and-rail bit set. The door edges are lipped with the Amana no. 55300.


3. Overlay--Walk through any home center and look at the display cabinetsand this is the style that you will see. Overlay doors are popular because they are quick and easy to install. In fact, an overlay door does not really fit the cabinet opening, it simply covers the opening. However, with the right combination of profiles overlay doors can provide a striking appearance to a new kitchen. For the door in this drawing I recommend the Amana no.55430 Ogee Stile-and-Rail, the no. 49534 Door Edge and theno. 54121 Raised Panel bit. Notice that all three of these profiles are a variation of the classic reverse curve ogee.

As you can see from the three designs that I've offered, by using different combinations of stile-and-rail profiles, raised panel profiles, and door edges the possibilities are virtually endless. And Amana Tool offers one of the most complete lines of door making router bits available anywhere.

Cabinet Doors?

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I'm planning on using the Amana #55421 Stile and Rail set for constructing cabinet doors. Does Amana have a bit for shaping a 1/4" radius lip on the door edge?


I'd also like to use the Amana no.55360 Divided Light Door Set for the upper doors. What do you recommend for securing the glass?


Fort Collins, CO

-Larry 

Our Expert


To shape the 1/4" door lip I suggest that you use the Amana no.55300 bit and swap the 3/8" radius cutter with the 1/4" radius cutter on the no. 55421
Stile and rail set
.


When using the Amana no. 55360 Divided Light Door bit set you can secure the glass in the rabbet with wood strips, silicone caulk, or for a more traditional appearance, door glazing putty tinted to match the color of the wood.

Raised Panel Doors?

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You mentioned one time a way to get cope and stick doors with a long tenon. Is there a preferred way to achieve the looks of a cope an stick with the strength of a long tenon in the complementary mortise?


Victor, MT

-Don

Our Expert


Amana now has two cabinet door making bit sets which feature strong mortise-and-tenon joinery and coped sticking. Tools no. 47515 and 54175 create a mating cope-and-stick panel door. Amana no .55360 creates a cope-and-stick divided light door. Both products use real mortise-and-tenon joinery for strength.


Still another method is to use a roundover profile, such as Amana Tool no.49514, for the decorative sticking and cut miters at the corners. This is a tried-and-true method that allows you to use real mortise-and-tenon joinery with any sticking profile that you choose. This is also the method that I use at my school when teaching how to construct paneled doors with mortise and tenon joinery.


Vertical Tambour Doors?

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I'm making a tambour with vertical slats. However, the slats keep shifting and racking out of the grooves. How can you keep the tambours from racking? Have you run across this problem before? The bits, by the way, are awesome, and the pieces fit together beautifully. Thanks for your response. 


St Helena, CA

-Mac 

Our Expert


I suspect that the tambour slats are too short. Just like a drawer that is too narrow for the opening, the short slats rack and bind. I've tried the slats in vertical grooves and they slide smoothly with little effort.


To calculate the slat length, I measure the distance between the grooves and subtract 1/64". After applying the finish, I apply wax to the groove and to the slat ends.

Doors and Cabinet?

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I want to build three layer doors and want to know which router bit set would let me shape the stiles and rails that would fit each other. ie the set that would be the reverse profile to each other.


Bakersfield, CA

-Emilio 

Our Expert


Amana has a number of router bit sets for constructing cabinet doors. The popular InStile sets such as Amana no. 55433 adjust to accommodate undersized
plywood panels. The Amana Two-Piece sets use mating stile and rail cutters and are available in three popular profiles such as the no.55430 ogee. The most economical option is the Amana Reversible Stile and Rail bits such as the no. 55370.

Livingroom cabinet raised panel doors?

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I have to duplicate existing doors. I am using the Amana #55420 and #54227 router bits. Here is the issue. Looking at the back of the doors, there is no gap between back of panel and rail and stiles. Also, the panel is inset from the back by about 1/8" on 13/16" stock. Using the Amana back cutter gives a curve which allows a spacing to be in the back of the door. If the back cutter was square instead of curved, there would be no gap. I think I have to revert to taking off the back cutter, cut the raised panel front, then using a 3/4" straight cutter, cut the lower edges of the back panel to eliminate the panel/stile/rail gap. Is there a square 2 1/8" x 5/16" x 5/16" back cutter I could replace the curved one with? Am I doing something wrong to need this?


Vienna, VA

-Doug 

Our Expert


You can use the Amana no.49302 rabbet bit to cut a square recess in the back. However, keep in mind that if you're using a solid wood panel that space is required for seasonal wood movement. In other words, as the relative humidity rises in the summer months, the panel will expand across the grain an it will need approximately 1/16" on each edge to prevent pushing the door frame apart.

Roll top desk?

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My questions concern the groove into which the tambour slides on my roll top desk project. The tambour is constructed using Amana's tambour router bit set. Amana literature shows the groove to be 9/16" wide. First question: do you have a pattern type router bit that you would recommend to rout the groove. Second question: the distance between the two side panels in which the tambour will slide is 59". Would you recommend the groove to be deeper than 1/4" (used with the breadbox plans) because of the length of the tambour (slide panels are 15/16" thick)? Last question: I am planning on staining the tambour slats individually and spraying each slat using a water borne lacquer, is this acceptable?


Alliance, OH

-Chuck 

Our Expert


At the present time we have not added a 9/16" pattern bit to the catalog; we suggest that you use a 9/16" straight bit with a bushing attached to the sub-base of the router.


Using a 3/8" deep groove on a 60" span is a good idea. Just be certain that the stock thickness is sufficient for the added depth.


As long as the lacquer is hard (as opposed to a softer finish such as a thick coat of varnish) the tambour should slide smoothly. If you're concerned then it may be a good idea to mask the ends of the slats and simply apply wax to the contact surfaces.

Our Expert


Yes, the Amana no.54117 raised panel router bit shapes a traditional profile which is suitable for 18th century reproductions. For woodworkers with a shaper, Amana offers the no.984 shaper cutter. Both of these tools create a 15 degree bevel along the panel edge.

Glass panel cabinet doors?

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I just bought a set of TRS-210 glass panel bits. I have made plenty of cabinet doors in the past. How do you set up the slot cutter bit so that I can make the cut right the first time? It came w/o instructions. Just need a little guidance. Thank you.


Beulah, MI

-Norman

Our Expert


First shape a stile. Then position the glass into the rabbet and mark the groove location with a layout knife. Next, adjust the slot cutter height to align with the knife line.

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